Can Dallas Live Small?

BA Norrgard is taking her tiny house on tour, but the Dallas native is hoping living small will catch on in her hometown.

BA Norrgard is taking her tiny house on tour, but the Dallas native is hoping living small will catch on in her hometown.

We’ve been following BA Norrgard and her quest to live small — tiny even! — in a hand-built home after divesting herself of her mortgage and working to help people simplify, simplify, simplify. And as much as I love her mission, I have to wonder if Norrgard’s work is ever going to pay off. Can the people of Dallas, a place whose very motto is “Big Things Happen Here,” live small?

Perhaps the real question is this: Can we appreciate time outside, putting more emphasis on experience and less on material things? That’s what Katie Arnold asked in her essay for Outside magazine:

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Tumbleweed Tiny Home

We’re seeing Jed Kolko’s name pop up all over the place nowadays. This time it was in this Wall Street Journal piece comparing how the word “cozy” is often used to denote “small” properties in real estate markets.

“Cozy is one of those words that means very different things in different markets. Cozy in Texas is not what’s cozy in San Francisco,” says Jed Kolko, chief economist at TruliaTRLA +0.02% a real-estate website.

Trulia examined for-sale listings, excluding foreclosures, in 100 U.S. metro areas between Jan. 1, 2011, and Nov. 30, 2012. “In every metro area, homes that mention cozy are smaller than listings that do not,” Mr. Kolko says.

Tiny Apartment

I love how the story compares Dallas “cozy” to New York “cozy” (read: claustrophobic). Of course, we get the total cliche out of the way thanks to Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s agent Christy Berry:

“Cozy almost means small, and we don’t have small. Everything is bigger in Texas,” she says.

Maybe it’s true: We do have some gigantic properties in Texas, but really, can Texas do “cozy” justice?

Tumbleweed Tiny Home

We’re seeing Jed Kolko’s name pop up all over the place nowadays. This time it was in this Wall Street Journal piece comparing how the word “cozy” is often used to denote “small” properties in real estate markets.

“Cozy is one of those words that means very different things in different markets. Cozy in Texas is not what’s cozy in San Francisco,” says Jed Kolko, chief economist at TruliaTRLA +0.02% a real-estate website.

Trulia examined for-sale listings, excluding foreclosures, in 100 U.S. metro areas between Jan. 1, 2011, and Nov. 30, 2012. “In every metro area, homes that mention cozy are smaller than listings that do not,” Mr. Kolko says.

Tiny Apartment

I love how the story compares Dallas “cozy” to New York “cozy” (read: claustrophobic). Of course, we get the total cliche out of the way thanks to Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s agent Christy Berry:

“Cozy almost means small, and we don’t have small. Everything is bigger in Texas,” she says.

Maybe it’s true: We do have some gigantic properties in Texas, but really, can Texas do “cozy” justice?