"Small land sales" in West Texas range from 500 to 8,000 acres and can average $1,637 per acre.

“Small land sales” in West Texas range from 500 to 8,000 acres and can average $1,635 per acre. Photo:

The Texas Association of Realtors just released the small land sales report, which showed double-digit growth and increases in average price for acre for the state. However, Far West Texas saw a price drop in 2014. Dubbed Region Two, land prices shrank by 47.24 percent to $1,635 per acre.

“Historically, the Texas land market has been closely linked to the performance of the oil and gas and agricultural markets, but right now that’s not the case,” said Charles Gilliland, an economist with the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University.  “Oil, cotton and corn prices are significantly down, but small land sales in Texas remain robust and in high demand.”

The Real Estate Center defines a “small land tract” on a sliding scale depending on the region. It can be between 30 acres and 160 acres depending on the location. In Far West Texas, a small land sale can range between 500 and 8,000 acres.

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Photo courtesy of Ray Bodden

Photo courtesy of Ray Bodden through a Creative Commons license

Texas is the place to be for economic prosperity and job growth, which in turn has made our real estate market one of the best in the nation, according to the 2014 Texas Annual Housing Report, released this week by the Texas Association of Realtors.

Nearly every area of real estate in the Lone Star State continues to get bigger and better, some of it astoundingly so, the report shows. Most notably, growth has happened in luxury home sales, international home buying, relocation activity, condominium sales, and remodeling trends.

“It’s a great time to live in Texas. The high demand for Texas real estate is not being fueled by speculation and investment activity—it’s driven by the thousands of people who move to the Lone Star State daily,” said Dan Hatfield, chairman of the Texas Association of Realtors. “People are moving to Texas from across America and around the world to take part in our state’s booming economy, business-friendly environment, and quality of life.” (more…)

Dallas Q3 Housing Report

During the course of the year, spring and summer tend to be the hottest seasons for home sales, with the pace of closings slowing as fall takes hold and school starts. That’s not what happened in Texas during the third quarter of 2014, says the Texas Association of Realtors Quarterly Housing Report, which was released just now. Additionally, inventory increased this quarter each month, continuing to fuel brisk sales in some areas.

In Dallas, though, sales are down year-over-year by 2.36 percent, while median home prices are up 8.73 percent and inventory is down precipitously from Q3 2013 by 10.71 percent. Logic says that, until inventory increases, home prices will continue to increase and sales will continue their slow, downward trend. Still, some areas are seeing increases (Midway Hollow, Lakewood, Lake Highlands, West Kessler) while some areas and price ranges remain sluggish. All real estate is local, y’all!

“The third quarter of the year is typically a much slower sales period – summer is over, school has started and families are staying put for the upcoming holiday season. That was not the case this year,” said TAR chairman Dan Hatfield. “Texas home sales continue to slightly exceed last year’s levels. If this trend continues, 2014 will surpass 2013 to become the second-best year ever for Texas real estate.”

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We’ve been talking about this trend for some time, but thanks to the business-friendly environment Great State of Texas and our fantastic job market, more people are moving to our state from areas where there are fewer jobs and houses cost a whole lot more.

And of course, when more people relocate to Texas, that means more real estate clients. A total of 138,057 new clients according to the statistics from the Texas Association of Realtors’ “Texas Relocation Report.”

The report, which uses data from 2013 American Community Survey, the 2008-2012 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau, as well as the U-Haul 2013 National Migration Trend Reports shows that Texas is outpacing Florida, California, Georgia, and North Carolina in the number of people moving from out of state.

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So, as it turns out, if household income increases, then more families have more money to buy new homes.

I know. I’m totally shocked, too.

What you’ll find interesting is that Texas, with our steady job market and low taxes has resulted in the Lone Star State leading median household income growth AND new home sales for 2013. In Texas, homebuyers are basically like this:

Aziz Ansari Make it Rain

And home builders, they’re like Liz Lemon here:

Tiny-Fey-Money Dance Make it Rain

 

“This year’s Texas Homebuyers and Sellers Report is showing the impact of the last few years’ strong housing market and economic growth on Texas homebuyers and sellers,” said Dan Hatfield, chairman of the Texas Association of Realtors. “Households are earning more income and new home development continues to play an increasingly important role to meet our state’s ever-increasing housing demand.”

Yup, we’re makin’ it rain, folks. The report, which uses data from the National Association of Realtors, says that Texas homebuyers’ median household income is up 9.6 percent to $91,700 year-over-year in 2013. That’s almost twice the increase in buying power of the average American homeowner, which increased just 5.6 percent to $83,300. First-time homebuyers are making more scratch, too, with a 9.3 percent increase in median household income to $67,800 year-over-year. Repeat homebuyers are making more modest gains, though, with median incomes up just 4.9 percent to $107,100. Still, that’s a lot of simoleons, peeps. And I wonder how many of these new homebuyers are using homebuilding concierges such as Page One to make their experience even better.

Interesting takeaways from the report:

1) Of all homes purchased in Texas for 2013, 30 percent were new homes, up 4 percent from 2012 and almost twice the proportion among home sales nationwide.

2) With tight-fisted lenders rivaling Scrooge McDuck and home prices skyrocketing, married couples continue to lead the homebuyer demographic, up 2 points in 2013 to 71 percent.

3) First-time homebuyers in Texas are a shrinking share of the market, down 2 percent to 33 percent.

4) “In 2013, the average Texas homebuyer was 43 years old, while the average first-time buyer was 31 years old and the average repeat buyer was 50 years old. This is on trend with the ages of homebuyers nationally,” the report stated.

5) The time frame a homeowner actually owns a property decreased from nine years to eight in 2013, but nationally, figures still show homeowners staying in their home nine years. tenure of owning a home in Texas decreased one year to eight years in 2013, but remained unchanged at nine years nationally.

6) 94 percent of Texans sold their home with a Realtor in 2013 (YAY!), compared to 91 percent nationally. Likewise, “FSBO homes in Texas sold for significantly less than homes sold using a  Realtor. The average Texas FSBO home sold for $153,500, compared to $200,000 for the average Realtor-assisted home sale.”

What tidbit of data strikes you the most?

Lance Armstrong Lake Austin

We knew 2013 was a banner year for Dallas Realtors as our market pulled itself up by its bootstraps and posted post-recession growth that amazed even the most seasoned brokers. But according to research from the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University, the market posted year-over-year numbers that showed Texas flexing its economic muscles like never before.

Numbers are up across most demographics, with condo sales, luxury sales, and investment properties getting snatched up at record paces.

“The Texas real estate market showed strength in sales volume and price all year long and the fourth quarter was no exception,” said Texas Association of Realtors chairman Dan Hatfield. “We’ve now seen year-over-year increases in both sales volume and price every quarter for more than two years. This makes it clear – demand for Texas homes is strong and enduring.”

We agree, as the Texas tech industry continues to boom in Austin, pushing up prices and demand reminiscent of the Bay Area’s unfettered growth. High salaries and limited inventories — the statewide numbers show a precipitous drop to a 3.6-month supply of homes (6.5 is recommended for balance between supply and demand) — have resulted in huge price increases. But, as Candy pointed out, not all growth is good for everyone. As prices increase, housing affordability decreases, pushing out lower wage earners.

But Austin’s growth isn’t isolated, as every metropolitan area in Texas posted sales volume and price increases in the fourth quarter of 2013. According to the report, 60,998 single-family homes were sold in the state during the fourth quarter — 6.78 percent more than fourth quarter 2012. Median home prices increased 8.48 percent from fourth quarter 2012 to $172,600, and the average home price was a whopping $226,216 — up 8.88 percent from Q4 2012.

Real Estate Center economist Jim Gaines Ph.D. explained: “One thing that is notable about the price increases seen in the fourth quarter is that they are relatively consistent across the state. Those increases are being seen in markets of every size, not just in the largest Texas markets, so that indicates broad-based appreciation for Texas real estate.”

“Demand for Texas homes in 2014 should continue, but it’s possible that a shortage of inventory could inhibit sales volumes,” Gaines added. “The steady price increases we’ve seen recently should help alleviate that, enticing more sellers into the market, but buyers should continue to expect to compete for desirable properties.”

Interesting outlook for 2014. What do you think? Will the growth price-wise lure more sellers to the market?

Swananoah Front

Homes priced at $1 million or more are moving like hotcakes in Texas, according to the 2014 Texas Luxury Home Sales Report from the Texas Association of Realtors. The figures, assembled using data from the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University, show that every Texas metro area posted double-digit growth in luxury price ranges.

Dallas posted a 22 percent increase in luxury home sales for the period between January and October 2013, the report shows, with Austin posting a whopping 55 percent increase (no wonder Trulia is calling our capital city way overvalued). Houston came in second with a 46 percent increase in luxury home sales, and San Antonio posted an 18 percent increase.

“Data from the Texas Luxury Home Sales Report shows that million-dollar homes are playing an increasingly important role in the Texas housing market,” said Dan Hatfield, chairman of the Texas Association of Realtors. “The housing slump is behind us and as Texas’ economy and population continue to accelerate, we’re going to see increasing development and demand in larger, higher-priced homes with luxury amenities.”

So, what’s driving the increase? It’s mostly thanks to the influx of high-paying tech jobs in Austin, and in Houston it’s likely due to oil and gas wealth moving into the area. For Dallas, a brisk job market driven by a healthy financial sector, as well as oil and gas wealth, could be fueling the luxury real estate market. The increase in sales definitely shows appreciation, though, and it makes you wonder just how many of these $1 million-plus properties are second homes or even investments.

“It’s common for luxury homes to have a significantly longer sell time and higher housing inventory than the average home simply because the pool of interested homebuyers is so much smaller,” said Jim Gaines Ph. D., and economist with the Real Estate Center. “However, this data still indicates strong demand, particularly in Austin, where homes of $1 million or higher are close to 10 percent of all active listings and are selling in less than six months, and in Houston, where housing inventory is only 7.4 months.”

Here’s the Dallas-Fort Worth market breakdown from the report:

In the Dallas-Fort Worth area, 809 luxury homes were sold between January and October 2013. Luxury home sales made up 1.1 percent of the total housing market and experienced a 22 percent increase in sales compared to the same period in 2012. This is slightly higher than the 19 percent year-over-year increase of the Dallas-Fort Worth housing market as a whole. As of October 2013, there were 922 active luxury home listings, 4.1 percent of all active listings on the market. The housing inventory for a luxury home was 11.4 months, 8.4 additional months than that of the Dallas-Fort Worth housing market at large.

 

 

 

2340-Victory-Park-Lane.jpg 27PH

We’ve talked until we’re blue in the face about how brisk the market its for single-family homes in North Texas, and Dallas especially, but the market for condominiums is just as hot according to the 2013 Texas Condominium Sales Report from the Texas Association of Realtors.

We definitely agree, and we noted in November that luxury units are moving quickly, selling units in buildings in Uptown, the Arts District, Downtown, and the Cedars like hotcakes!

Texas’ four major metro areas all showed double-digit increases in condo and townhome sales, said the report featuring data from the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University. Austin, Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio experienced an average 26 percent increase in condominium sales in  2013, but Dallas led the pack with a huge 38 percent jump in sales, followed by Houston at 25 percent, Austin at 24 percent, and San Antonio at 18 percent.

“Data from the Texas Condominium Sales Report shows that all types of housing are in demand in Texas,” said Shad Bogany, chairman of the Texas Association of Realtors. “Given the rapid job and population growth across Texas’ major metro areas as well as our state’s shrinking housing inventory, it’s no surprise condo sales are playing an increasingly important role in the Texas housing market.”

The report echoes the trends we’ve been noticing in housing here at CandysDirt.com: High demand thanks to a healthy job market is fueling higher prices, and homes are flying off the market, leaving the Dallas Real Estate market feeling like picked-over department store shelves after Black Friday.

“Inventory is at an all-time low for both condominiums and single-family homes, but the development of new condos and townhomes has lagged behind that of single-family homes through the housing recovery” said Jim Gaines, PhD., economist with the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University. “As a result, we’re at least a year or two away from delivering the condos that are currently needed in Texas’s metro areas.”

Here’s the report for Dallas:

In Dallas, 4,468 condos were sold between January and September 2013. Compared to the same period in 2012, the median price increased 10 percent to $153,000. The number of new listings also increased 10 percent to 6,311, whereas active listings dropped 26 percent to 1,607 listings and pending sales jumped 33 percent to 4,077 year-over-year. Finally, days on the market dropped to 67 days, a 28 percent decrease from the year prior.

You can read the full, city-by-city report right here.