With the advent of photo-heavy online listings visible from anywhere, video tours, and slideshows, many Realtors have already ordered a tombstone for the Open House. But should we start eulogizing a long-held practice that can give sellers much-needed feedback and turn looky-loos into serious buyers?

That’s the argument Brendon Desimone poses in his blog post, saying that serious buyers are developed over time, and just browsing listings online won’t sell them on one particular home.

“Open houses give buyers a no-pressure environment in which to deepen their education about the local market, so they can make a more informed decision,” Desimone says. “A buyer may use an open house as a first showing of the property. But when buyers become serious about a home, an open house provides them another opportunity to spend time in the home, to get to know it better, without the confines of a 15-minute private appointment.”

I agree with some of what Desimone says, but there are so many websites out there that break down important market information, giving buyers an economic outlook on a property long before they’re ready to commit. Trulia does a great job of this with its graphic interface and easily accessible message boards that facilitate discussion about neighborhoods. Let’s use our Friday Four Hundred, 5802 Monticello, for example. To the right you can see agents and potential buyers talking about the neighborhood at length — a wonderful resource for buyer education.

Trulia 5802 Monticello screenshot

 

Of course, what you don’t get from all of this buyer education is a feel for neighborhood traffic. Is this home near a noisy intersection? How close are you to shopping? Are there other families and pedestrians nearby? That’s where an open house really provides an added benefit. Buyers can linger, walk around the neighborhood, get a feel for their surroundings.

Of course, one open house is a lot easier to manage than a gazillion individual showings, says Desimone. Agreed, but it also opens the home to people who aren’t interested in buying at all, including neighbors and thieves, as Rogers Healy recently mentioned on Fox Business News’ The Willis Report. But they do give agents and sellers an opportunity to get some feedback on a listing, Desimone says.

“A good listing agent will want to see as many buyers come through as possible to gauge their reactions to the home,” he offers. “Are people walking in and out quickly? Or are they hanging around? What questions are they asking? What are their biggest hang-ups or concerns? This is the kind of valuable information you can’t get online.”

Agreed. You won’t get a lot of feedback from buyers who shop mostly online, and a seller’s agent won’t likely be at showings, so besides critiques from stagers and other agents, this is likely the only direct feedback sellers can get.

What do you think? Is the Open House a relic, or is it relevant?

With the advent of photo-heavy online listings visible from anywhere, video tours, and slideshows, many Realtors have already ordered a tombstone for the Open House. But should we start eulogizing a long-held practice that can give sellers much-needed feedback and turn looky-loos into serious buyers?

That’s the argument Brendon Desimone poses in his blog post, saying that serious buyers are developed over time, and just browsing listings online won’t sell them on one particular home.

“Open houses give buyers a no-pressure environment in which to deepen their education about the local market, so they can make a more informed decision,” Desimone says. “A buyer may use an open house as a first showing of the property. But when buyers become serious about a home, an open house provides them another opportunity to spend time in the home, to get to know it better, without the confines of a 15-minute private appointment.”

I agree with some of what Desimone says, but there are so many websites out there that break down important market information, giving buyers an economic outlook on a property long before they’re ready to commit. Trulia does a great job of this with its graphic interface and easily accessible message boards that facilitate discussion about neighborhoods. Let’s use our Friday Four Hundred, 5802 Monticello, for example. To the right you can see agents and potential buyers talking about the neighborhood at length — a wonderful resource for buyer education.

Trulia 5802 Monticello screenshot

 

Of course, what you don’t get from all of this buyer education is a feel for neighborhood traffic. Is this home near a noisy intersection? How close are you to shopping? Are there other families and pedestrians nearby? That’s where an open house really provides an added benefit. Buyers can linger, walk around the neighborhood, get a feel for their surroundings.

Of course, one open house is a lot easier to manage than a gazillion individual showings, says Desimone. Agreed, but it also opens the home to people who aren’t interested in buying at all, including neighbors and thieves, as Rogers Healy recently mentioned on Fox Business News’ The Willis Report. But they do give agents and sellers an opportunity to get some feedback on a listing, Desimone says.

“A good listing agent will want to see as many buyers come through as possible to gauge their reactions to the home,” he offers. “Are people walking in and out quickly? Or are they hanging around? What questions are they asking? What are their biggest hang-ups or concerns? This is the kind of valuable information you can’t get online.”

Agreed. You won’t get a lot of feedback from buyers who shop mostly online, and a seller’s agent won’t likely be at showings, so besides critiques from stagers and other agents, this is likely the only direct feedback sellers can get.

What do you think? Is the Open House a relic, or is it relevant?

Update 2:47 p.m.: The plot thickens! We had this video posted earlier, but agreed to take it down because it may have used certain signs and logos without permission. Whatevs, we know you can find it for yourselves because nothing ever leaves the internet. This brings up a whole new conversation about these spoof videos: are they catching on with a certain generation only?

Sometimes we at CandysDirt.com love digging into the dark corners of the Internet to find some gems that need to see the light of day. A few days ago we found one such Internet gem: A real estate music video spoof featuring Dallas Realtor Lydia Player and two adorable cohorts, Ryan Booth and Johnny Mowad.

The Realtor spoof video is a growing trend, featuring pop hits like “Call Me Maybe” by Carly Rae Jepsen, and “Gangnam Style” by Psy. Re/Max Lexington Bluegrass Team went one step further and made their own rap video, which is just incredible!

Realtor Open House Spoof Lydia Player

After a little more digging we found the producer of the video, Anthony Galo, who is actually an intern at Clay Stapp & Co! We asked Galo a few questions, and Clay was kind enough to give him a few minutes between making copies and coffee (we kid! we kid!) to answer them.

CandysDirt.com: So, how did you end up in the real estate biz, interning for Clay Stapp? What’s it like?
Anthony Galo: I never thought the real estate business was this much fun! I entered the real estate world in the summer of 2012 as an intern at CLAY STAPP+CO and came back for this summer to intern for Clay again! I owe it to CSCO for all the opportunities I have had in the real estate field.

CD: The video is adorable. Tell us what it was like to shoot and produce the spoof.
Galo: I am so glad you all enjoyed the video! It was a pleasure producing. The video was shot in about 2-4 hours. I spent a few days editing the video. The editing process wasn’t a long process since I had prior experience from the previous summer when I filmed some homes for Clay. Also, our singers were great! The female voice was Emily Naul, who did an amazing job! Our male singer was a close friend of mine, Elliot Skinner, he actually has performed on national television with Keith Urban! It was great having both singers with us, they knocked it out!

CD: What was it like working with Lydia, Ryan, and Johnny?
Galo: Working with some top Ebby realtors was so much fun! They had the perfect characteristics for the video and just had fun with it! I really did enjoy producing this video, the agents gave me more power and energy than I had expected so it made my job a lot easier!