Tyler Lebaron Great Western Featured Realtor

What a fun personality this Rogers Healy + Associates Realtor has! Tyler LeBaron, a hilarious and hard-working agent, knows how to win clients over with tremendous service and loyalty. He’s risen in the ranks in Dallas after attending SMU’s Cox School of Business, showing that it’s a winning formula.

Does your lender work hard to win your clients over? Jeff Lindigrin at Great Western Home Loans does. Jeff takes great care as a lender, as he should. Of course, every sale should have a lender that works just as hard to get a great deal as their Realtor. What has your lender done for you lately? Find out what you’re missing by contacting Jeff Lindigrin with Great Western Home Loans today.

Find out more about Tyler after the jump!

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Find Beverly

I just got off the phone with Dallas Police Department’s North Central Patrol Division Neighborhood Police Officer Mark Lutz, who will be giving us more detailed tips in the coming days on how Realtors can better protect themselves from dangerous criminals, so stay tuned.

Until then, real estate agents can take some comfort in the news that Arkansas officials have apprehended Arron M. Lewis, a convicted felon and parolee accused of kidnapping Little Rock real estate agent Beverly Carter while showing a vacant property. Lewis escaped from an area hospital after a single-car accident just 30 minutes from the bank-owned home Carter was showing when she disappeared. Yesterday, after his escape from the hospital, a judge issued a warrant for his arrest. A Facebook page has been started to help disseminate information regarding Carter’s disappearance.

Of course, this has some Realtors wondering how to best keep this from happening to them. Lutz suggests that a third-party background check would be helpful to screen out potentially risky clients, such as SecureShow. Otherwise, staying aware of dangerous situations is key, Lutz said, as well as calling 911 the moment you suspect something is up.

Inman News says that some agents are calling this incident a “wake-up call” for Realtors. What do you think?

The cool pops of color at the front entrance are hints of just h

I have a confession to make: If this house were a person, it would have to take a restraining order out on me. That’s how hard I’ve been stalking this beauty, waiting patiently for Virginia Cook Realtor Ed Murchison to put this gorgeous midcentury modern home at 10845 Eden Roc on MLS. And now it’s here, and you, too, can bask in the fantastic original details inside this two-story home that takes full advantage of its sloping lot in Sylvania Dells, a Lake Highlands neighborhood that has tons of architecturally interesting mid-mods. It’s priced at  $475,000.

There are so many cool details to this property, many of which are original to the home. It is definitely one of those houses that will impress a midcentury modern enthusiast.

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Medley Buttermore GW Featured Realtor

We love it when Realtors are down-to-earth and fun to chat with. There’s no pretense, and they are just happy to meet you! That’s Medley Buttermore, for you. An SMU grad who became an agent to make ends meet after college, Buttermore has become an important part of Virginia Cook Realtors’ Melnick Team.

Besides having an awesome name, Buttermore is known for looking out for her clients, just like Jeff Lindigrin does at Great Western Home Loans. Jeff takes great care as a lender, as he should. Of course, every sale should have a lender that works just as hard to get a great deal as their Realtor. What has your lender done for you lately? Find out what you’re missing by contacting Jeff Lindigrin with Great Western Home Loans today.

Now, read on to find out more about Medley Buttermore!

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Conor Head 3

Sure, Conor Riley was raised in California, but we won’t hold it against this fast-rising star at Dave Perry-Miller and Associates. We absolutely adore Riley, who is wise beyond his years, sharp as a tack, and fast with a smile, and he’s a great surfer, to boot!

In fact, he reminds us a lot of Jeff Lindigrin of Great Western Home Loans, as both of these great businessmen focus on customer experience in a very fast-paced market. Jeff takes great care as a lender, as he should. Of course, every sale should have a lender that works just as hard to get a great deal as their Realtor. What has your lender done for you lately? Find out what you’re missing by contacting Jeff Lindigrin with Great Western Home Loans today.

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Erika-Warfield-Realtor-2869-LowRez

Talk about an interesting Realtor! Erika Warfield has a background in TV and has a passion for real estate. Warfield, whose a Realtor with Dallas City Center, is a Dallas transplant who loves our city and is the first to say that she may not be a native, but she got her as soon as she could.

Besides channelling Joan Jett and being an altogether rock star (really!) Warfield is funny, humble, straightforward, and so much fun to talk to. Those are all fantastic assets you want in a Realtor, which is why she is this week’s Great Western Home Loans Featured Realtor, sponsored by Jeff Lindigrin.

Jeff takes great care as a lender, as he should. Of course, every sale should have a lender that works just as hard to get a great deal as their Realtor. What has your lender done for you lately? Find out what you’re missing by contacting Jeff Lindigrin with Great Western Home Loans today.

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With the advent of photo-heavy online listings visible from anywhere, video tours, and slideshows, many Realtors have already ordered a tombstone for the Open House. But should we start eulogizing a long-held practice that can give sellers much-needed feedback and turn looky-loos into serious buyers?

That’s the argument Brendon Desimone poses in his blog post, saying that serious buyers are developed over time, and just browsing listings online won’t sell them on one particular home.

“Open houses give buyers a no-pressure environment in which to deepen their education about the local market, so they can make a more informed decision,” Desimone says. “A buyer may use an open house as a first showing of the property. But when buyers become serious about a home, an open house provides them another opportunity to spend time in the home, to get to know it better, without the confines of a 15-minute private appointment.”

I agree with some of what Desimone says, but there are so many websites out there that break down important market information, giving buyers an economic outlook on a property long before they’re ready to commit. Trulia does a great job of this with its graphic interface and easily accessible message boards that facilitate discussion about neighborhoods. Let’s use our Friday Four Hundred, 5802 Monticello, for example. To the right you can see agents and potential buyers talking about the neighborhood at length — a wonderful resource for buyer education.

Trulia 5802 Monticello screenshot

 

Of course, what you don’t get from all of this buyer education is a feel for neighborhood traffic. Is this home near a noisy intersection? How close are you to shopping? Are there other families and pedestrians nearby? That’s where an open house really provides an added benefit. Buyers can linger, walk around the neighborhood, get a feel for their surroundings.

Of course, one open house is a lot easier to manage than a gazillion individual showings, says Desimone. Agreed, but it also opens the home to people who aren’t interested in buying at all, including neighbors and thieves, as Rogers Healy recently mentioned on Fox Business News’ The Willis Report. But they do give agents and sellers an opportunity to get some feedback on a listing, Desimone says.

“A good listing agent will want to see as many buyers come through as possible to gauge their reactions to the home,” he offers. “Are people walking in and out quickly? Or are they hanging around? What questions are they asking? What are their biggest hang-ups or concerns? This is the kind of valuable information you can’t get online.”

Agreed. You won’t get a lot of feedback from buyers who shop mostly online, and a seller’s agent won’t likely be at showings, so besides critiques from stagers and other agents, this is likely the only direct feedback sellers can get.

What do you think? Is the Open House a relic, or is it relevant?

With the advent of photo-heavy online listings visible from anywhere, video tours, and slideshows, many Realtors have already ordered a tombstone for the Open House. But should we start eulogizing a long-held practice that can give sellers much-needed feedback and turn looky-loos into serious buyers?

That’s the argument Brendon Desimone poses in his blog post, saying that serious buyers are developed over time, and just browsing listings online won’t sell them on one particular home.

“Open houses give buyers a no-pressure environment in which to deepen their education about the local market, so they can make a more informed decision,” Desimone says. “A buyer may use an open house as a first showing of the property. But when buyers become serious about a home, an open house provides them another opportunity to spend time in the home, to get to know it better, without the confines of a 15-minute private appointment.”

I agree with some of what Desimone says, but there are so many websites out there that break down important market information, giving buyers an economic outlook on a property long before they’re ready to commit. Trulia does a great job of this with its graphic interface and easily accessible message boards that facilitate discussion about neighborhoods. Let’s use our Friday Four Hundred, 5802 Monticello, for example. To the right you can see agents and potential buyers talking about the neighborhood at length — a wonderful resource for buyer education.

Trulia 5802 Monticello screenshot

 

Of course, what you don’t get from all of this buyer education is a feel for neighborhood traffic. Is this home near a noisy intersection? How close are you to shopping? Are there other families and pedestrians nearby? That’s where an open house really provides an added benefit. Buyers can linger, walk around the neighborhood, get a feel for their surroundings.

Of course, one open house is a lot easier to manage than a gazillion individual showings, says Desimone. Agreed, but it also opens the home to people who aren’t interested in buying at all, including neighbors and thieves, as Rogers Healy recently mentioned on Fox Business News’ The Willis Report. But they do give agents and sellers an opportunity to get some feedback on a listing, Desimone says.

“A good listing agent will want to see as many buyers come through as possible to gauge their reactions to the home,” he offers. “Are people walking in and out quickly? Or are they hanging around? What questions are they asking? What are their biggest hang-ups or concerns? This is the kind of valuable information you can’t get online.”

Agreed. You won’t get a lot of feedback from buyers who shop mostly online, and a seller’s agent won’t likely be at showings, so besides critiques from stagers and other agents, this is likely the only direct feedback sellers can get.

What do you think? Is the Open House a relic, or is it relevant?